27
Aug

Facebook Stops 5 Star Rating System

Much like Yelp, the business community has a love-hate relationship with Facebook. Recent actions may make that more hate than love. Over the last few months, Facebook has been adjusting how businesses are “rated” and how it is shared with their more-than two billion users. Their trial with 10 stars didn’t go over well. The latest shift walks away from the Facebook 5 star rating system almost completely and now focuses on “Recommendations”. What does this mean for users and businesses?

New Facebook Recommendations for Business

Users who want to comment on a business are now presented with a first step: “Do you recommend [business name]?” According to Facebook’s guidance, “Select ‘Yes’ to share what you love about a Page. Select ‘No’ to tell them how to improve”. If the answer is “Yes”, it becomes a Recommendation. If the answer is “No”, it becomes a review. Only after you have made this choice can you enter a rating or comments.

Facebook Recommendation promptA Recommendation is supposed to answer the question “What do you recommend about [business name]?” Users are welcome to enter any comment they like. Now this is where things become even more interesting. Recommendations are treated like a post to the user News Feed. They type their message, select a privacy setting, and then press Post. If they select any privacy setting other than Public, the review will not be shown to the world, nor will it count toward a Facebook Page’s score. But if “Public” is selected, it will go to the Page’s Reviews (or Recommendations) tab and be shown to all users. The same is true for a (negative) review.

If the user doesn’t want to give the business a Recommendation, they press “No” and leave a review. They will be prompted with “How could [business name] improve?”. The opportunity for comments, privacy, and posting will be the same.

The Quality of Facebook Page Feedback

Assuming Facebook is trying to improve the overall quality of the Recommendations system, they have instituted a minimum character requirement. Recommendations or reviews cannot be less than 25 characters. This would prevent such typical spam as “Love it!” or “this place sucks”. A side effect of a Recommendation system instead of stars is that Facebook Business Page managers will have spend more time asking for feedback, not just “5 stars”. They will also have to read that feedback to learn from it, not just brag to a CEO that the company has a high score and assume their job is done.

The unfortunate side effect of this new Facebook rating system is that fence-sitters may be left out. The experience may not have been awesome or terrible. Just a middle-of-the-road situation. They no longer have three stars to choose. They are forced to go to one extreme or the other and must also share a comment about their experience. This could dissuade “lurkers” or introverts from contributing.

How to Report a Facebook Review

The changes discussed so far will represent a significant shift to how most businesses interact with their customers, solicit feedback, and set their own KPIs. Whether they are good or bad for business is negotiable. One new feature is a definite win for businesses: reporting inaccurate reviews. Removing a bad Facebook review is easier under the new system. Facebook Page administrators and regular users can now report Facebook reviews for a variety of reasons. According to Facebook, they are doing this to ensure more “authentic” recommendations. Reviews can be reported for:

  • Recommendation not relevant
  • Unfair recommendation
  • Nudity
  • Violence
  • Harassment
  • Suicide or Self-injury
  • Spam
  • Drugs
  • Hate Speech

Facebook Review Change Aftermath

You may have noticed that businesses still have a score. Facebook has not deleted previous ratings. According to Facebook, scores are now a combination of previous ratings and new Recommendations and Reviews. There are rumors that response time may also be somehow included, but those have not been confirmed.  All of these changes mean a few things for business owners and reputation managers: stop asking for stars, thoroughly read and learn from “authentic” customer feedback, and gauge your success or failure on new standards.

If your organization is looking for professional guidance on how to effectively use this new system, contact our office to learn more about Arkside’s social media management and reputation management services.

1
Mar

How to Deal with Online Reviews

Reviews, both positive and negative, come with the territory of being a business and online reputation management. Some reviews are positive and say wonderful things about your business. Others are negative and detail customers frustrations about their experience. Regardless of whether a review is positive, negative, or somewhere in between, each and every review should be responded to in a timely manner. Many people we speak with want to know how to deal with online reviews. About 82% of American adults read reviews before they purchase something for the first time. That’s a lot of eyes looking at your reputation, so if you make sure your voice is present in the conversation you are able to help explain the negative reviews and encourage more positive ones.

Reviews as Part of Online Reputation Management

You have probably had a variety of experiences with online reviews. You may have received good ones, bad ones, or posted your own about business. They’re important. When it comes to handling ones posted about your business, there are best practices we recommend to obtain the best outcome. In most cases, you want to reply for a variety of reasons. There may be reasons to send a private message (when possible). In other circumstances it may be best to do both. Finally, the one everyone hopes for, just report the review as spam and watch it disappear. We’ll cover all of these scenarios below.

Why Respond To Positive Reviews

Did you know: 68% of reviews on Yelp are 4 or 5- star reviews? If your reviews mimic this trend, that’s 68% of your customer base that you are ignoring if you only take the time to respond to the negative reviews. Another benefit of responding to positive reviews, is that it helps build a better relationship with your customers, especially your “brandvocates”. If you receive a great review from Tami -a single mom, who you made feel at ease when you fixed her refrigerator- and take the time to respond to her review, you have continued your relationship by showing that you care about her opinion. People looking for refrigerator repair will see that Tami felt at ease with your service and will be more likely to hire you. Instead of just telling five of her friends that you did a great job, Tami just told thousands of other people about her experience which results in a huge group of potential new customers. Although Yelp doesn’t allow you to respond publicly and send a private message, there are times when it is good to do both. Do so on those sites that allow it. If a customer has been extremely loyal for a long period of time or referred significant business, we recommend doing both. In most cases, a public reply is sufficient.

Why Respond To Negative Reviews

Responding to negative reviews also benefits your business. By responding to negative reviews, you are proving that you hear your customers’ complaints, care about their experience or concerns and will do something to make it right. You may respond to Mark, who visited your restaurant and felt his hamburger was too dry. By replying to Mark, you acknowledge that you hear his complaint and can offer to comp his next meal or let him know you’ll speak with the staff so Mark will be more willing to give you another opportunity to earn his loyalty. By showing those reading your reviews that you are willing to make a situation right, you are demonstrating a commitment to customer service and great experiences.

In some cases you may not need to make amends. Often, the customer just wants to be heard and know that a problem is being addressed. An important guideline is to not take reviews personally. The public doesn’t want to see you get upset because they will think your next outburst could be directed at them.

On those sites that allow you to post a comment and send a message, doing both may be a bad idea. Ideally, you want them off the review site. Continuing your disagreement on the site is counterproductive. Be wary of the situation and act according to how you feel they will be most likely to react.

How Can I Remove Fake Reviews?

Sometimes businesses receive reviews they don’t deserve. This is one of the biggest challenges when it comes to how to deal with online reviews. For our clients, we have seen reviews posted by their competitors, customers who never actually had work done, and outlandish requests that are impossible to fulfill. These are some of the few examples of reviews that can potentially be removed. They are fraudulent in one way or another. Understand that all review sites are very reluctant to remove reviews. They aren’t interested in a factual dispute between two parties. This is true even when facts are not in dispute. You don’t have to make amends like you did with Mark, but make sure they feel heard. People are reading their review and do not understand the circumstances surrounding it. In some cases, you can explain the situation through your response but with others it allows you to get your voice into the conversation and just acknowledge that you understand how the reviewer feels.

Conclusion        

While replying to reviews may take a few minutes out of your day, it can vastly improve your appearance to potential customers. By taking the time to reply to reviews in a timely manner you show you care about your customers, value their opinions and concerns, and are willing to stand behind your business or product. Want to learn how we can help you with online reputation management? Contact us today!

26
Nov

Facebook Star Rating System Mystery

By now, it is no surprise that Facebook has launched another feature without much explanation of how it works. They do this with EdgeRank updates and advertising options. Of course, privacy glitches features have been repeatedly changed without explanation as well.

Almost Nothing Added to Facebook Help

In this case, Facebook unveiled a new 5-star rating system for business Pages and at least two weeks have gone by since any details have emerged from the Menlo Park headquartered company. The star ratings appear under a business name on their Page and seem to be visible to all Facebook users.

This is what we know from the two questions Facebook has added to its help section:

  • For a business to be rated, it must add an address to its profile
  • Businesses can remove their ratings by removing their address from their profile
  • Comments can accompany ratings, but they are not required

Unanswered Star Rating Questions

Other than showing the rating to the public, Facebook has not shared what this means to the Page owner.

1) Does a score impact how a Page appears in search results?
2) Why not show how many ratings have been received?
3) Are mobile and desktop ratings scored equally?
4) Are any filters applied to “score” ratings? (i.e. – John Smith has 1,000 friends and reviews many businesses…will his rating be worth more than Jane Doe who has 100 friends and rates 1 business a year?)
5) How are false reviews flagged/responded to/deleted?

As we said, these important issues are not being addressed so the system is of little value to businesses today.

Another Voice for Customer Service

However, there are some noteworthy elements about the project in general. The Facebook star rating seems designed to infringe on the business models of companies like Yelp and FourSquare. By connecting a rating system to a business’ Facebook Page, it reduces the need of someone to leave and see how they rank on another site. It also mimics the Page/Places/Local integration currently being attempted by Google on their Google+ social media platform.

It is the integration that is key. Social media sites are continuing to explore new options to integrate themselves into a user’s daily life. It also puts another focus on customer service within a business and making that reportable to the public. More and more, businesses are being forced to provide better experiences because each customer has a voice.

Facebook alone has 1.1 billion voices.

The new rating system is yet another element that must be incorporated into a business’ reputation management and overall social media efforts. They must solicit reviews from current customers, monitor their star rating, and promote a four or five star score.